Cats

Gator Loki and Sylvie the kittens were given a fighting chance, and are now thriving as a beautiful bonded pair.

adorable tiny kittens

Gator Loki and Sylvie the brother and sister duoKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

Kaitlyn, an animal ER nurse and neonatal fosterer based in Jacksonville, Florida, picked up two newborn kittens from a local TNR (trap, neuter, return) clinic.

The kittens had been born to a feral cat who showed no interest in caring for them. “The mom was not feeding them or cleaning them. They were only two days old but quickly wasting away,” Kaitlyn shared with Love Meow.

The kittens were so young that they would not be able to survive on their own, so Kaitlyn stepped in to help. “Within the first few days of being in my care, they began eating well and gaining weight fast.”

newborn cuddly kittens

The two kittens were born to a feral cat who showed no interest in themKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

“They went from filthy, emaciated, flea filled fluff balls to round bellied, soft cotton babies. They know love and comfort in each other.”

Before Gator Loki and Sylvie opened their eyes, they were already crawling and wriggling around in their comfy nest. Kaitlyn provided supportive care and treatment to ensure the two kittens continued to thrive.

newborn kitten

Gator Loki the little brotherKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

“They quickly became some of the chunkiest kittens I’ve cared for,” Kaitlyn shared with Love Meow.

Gator Loki and Sylvie often lock arms when they sleep, while purring up a storm — It is the sweetest thing to behold.

They are always together when they napKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

Gator Loki had his eyes fully open at two weeks old, while little Sylvie just started to welcome the sight of the world. They were vivacious and had ravenous appetites.

As the two grew bigger and stronger, their playful side came out in full swing.

kitten with big eyes

Sylvie demands attention from her foster mom. She is very convincingKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

The brother and sister would demand more toys and attention from their humans. They wrestled and tumbled, romping around the playpen without a care in the world.

When they were not busy play-fighting, they were cuddled up in a nap, snoozing away in bliss.

cuddly sleepy kittens

Best of friendsKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

With proper care and plenty of TLC, the kittens blossomed into beautiful teenage cats. When they were approaching six weeks, they had their first taste of wet canned food — they chowed down on it like champs.

Both kittens are natural lap kitties and make themselves rather comfortable snuggling with their human in tandem.

lap kittens

They turned into professional lap catsKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

“They are a bonded pair. They both are complete love and cuddle bugs, always ready to jump into my arms,” Kaitlyn told Love Meow.

sweet cotton kittens

The brother and sister share a strong bondKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

Sylvie is a little purr machine and her brother is full of energy. Together, they make a dynamic duo.

“As soon as you pick her up, she starts purring and giving kisses! Gator Loki is a little more rambunctious, and when he gets excited, he hops around like a little bunny.”

sweet kittens

Adorable little fur ballsKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

“The fostering process goes by so quick when looking back at the time spent. It’s incredibly rewarding to raise a fragile newborn into a strong kitten,” Kaitlyn shared.

They have grown to be beautiful young catsKaitlyn @foster.rinse.repeat

Share this story with your friends. Follow Gator Loki and Sylvia and Kaitlyn’s fosters on Instagram @foster.rinse.repeat.

Related story: Cat with Sweet Smile Finds Help to Raise Her Kittens and Never Has to Wander the Streets Again

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